Podcast Episode 5: Beating Mealtime Battles with Nourishing Food

by The Mum Tribe Podcast

In this week's episode I'm chatting with Jess from Nourish and Bloom. Jess is Certified Nutrition Consultant and she's passionate about helping parents create successful mealtimes with nourishing family food.

You can follow Jess on Instagram -  @nourishandbloombaby or check out her website - https://www.nourishandbloom.co.nz/ 


Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Hello there and welcome to The Mum Tribe podcast where we chat all things motherhood, parenting and everything in between. I'm Jess, your host and I'm mum to a beautiful wee girl named Isla. A really crucial part of my motherhood journey has been the sharing of stories and experiences with other mums that I've met or already knew. That really inspired me to create this podcast so that we can all share stories with each other and learn and grow together. The Mum Tribe is also an e-commerce store focusing on amazing products for mums and bubs, and also a blog focused on the experience of kiwi mums. Thank you for being here. Let's get into our episode for this week.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Hey, everyone, welcome to episode five of The Mum Tribe Podcast. Today I have the lovely Jess from Nourish and Bloom joining me. So Jess is a certified nutrition consultant. And she's passionate about creating nourishing and successful family mealtimes. As a toddler mum, this is really topical for me at the moment. So I'm really looking forward to learning a lot from her. So welcome Jess to The Mum Tribe podcast. It's awesome to have you here.

Jess Anderson

Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to be here today.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Great name, great name.

Jess Anderson

Jess squared. That's us.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

So tell me a little bit about your background and how you came to be doing the work you're doing.

Jess Anderson

Yes, sure. So I trained as an early childhood teacher, I did that in Dunedin for three years. And in your final year of teaching, you get a placement. And I was placed at a centre where I was with infant and toddlers for that whole year. And I loved it. I had never worked closely with like zero to two year olds before. And yeah, it really opened my eyes to this sort of different side of early childhood that you only see if you work with that age group. And so at the end of that year, they advertised for positions for the new centre. And I was so excited to get one of those positions. So I moved with them to the new centre. And then I worked there for just over three years, in the infant and toddler room, which is amazing. And then over the three years, I also started my own health journey.

Jess Anderson

So I watched a film called That Sugar Film. Have you seen that?

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah I have!

Jess Anderson

Yes, yeah. So I feel like everyone who has a journey or is on their own sort of health discovery, they always have like a moment in time that they remember being their sort of lightbulb moment or the moment that causes a lot of change for them. And this was definitely mine. So I remember watching that film, and then yeah, it just completely changed my life. I went home and like completely cleared out our whole pantry. I remember my husband, like my partner at the time, who's my husband now, he was just like, are you serious? And I was like, Yes, we're going to donate all this food. And we're going to start again. So because I took such a like headfirst approach, into what we were eating and being really conscious of ingredients and food, I also started to look at the food that we were offering in the centre that I was teaching at. And so it was sort of a natural progression.

Jess Anderson

I was very passionate about it. And I started making some sort of recommendations at the centre. But unfortunately, I was met with a bit of resistance, which I don't think that's talked about that often. But it happens quite a lot, in all workplaces. But I know it happens in teaching too. You know, these new teachers are coming through, straight out of Teacher's College and they're fresh wih of all their ideas. But you know, there's teachers who have been there for years and years and years. And so seeing these teachers come through, it can be sort of met with a bit of resistance. So that was a shame. But it didn't stop my passion for nutrition, but unfortunately, it did stop my teaching career.

Jess Anderson

So I left my teaching position. And then we moved to Wanaka, from Dunedin and then we fell pregnant. So we have a two and a half year old. And then once he was born, I took sort of like, yeah, about 18 months off doing any type of work. To be honest, the drive just wasn't just wasn't there at all for me. I was just completely immersed in mum life. And I also think for your listeners, for anyone who is in that same season. It is really common to have that drive completely go offline and not want do anything and I know many aren't left with a choice, you know that they have to go back to work at a certain point in time. And that's, you know, another sort of story. But if you can, just ride it out because it does come back. And then when it comes back, often, new mums can have these like incredible business ideas. I see it happening all the time. And generally it comes from their birth experience or their experience as a new mom. And they realise a gap in the market. So yeah, it's amazing.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

I totally agree.

Jess Anderson

Yes, yes. Like look at, you know, The Mum Tribe, I'm sure that sort of how that was birthed into the world as well. And so yeah, when I, when I did get that feeling, I you know, I started to feel like I was ready to dive back in to some type of work, but I just wasn't sure what that was going to look like.

Jess Anderson

And I knew that I wanted to do something different, but also something for myself, I didn't want to work for someone else. And when I started my son on solid foods when he was around six months, you know, it was another sort of lightbulb, waking up moment for me because I then realised the huge amount of like baby products and foods that are promoted and marketed at new parents. And I just, I just knew that this was that this was where I had to then focus my, my energy into supporting parents, you know, in that time, and then as he got older, and we navigated mealtimes as a toddler, I also saw a real gap there for supporting parents with how to manage, you know, meal refusal and mealtime behaviours, and just how to create mealtimes that everyone enjoys.

Jess Anderson

So I decided to study with the Oh Baby Holistic School of Nutrition. So they have baby nutrition, postpartum nutrition, and pregnancy nutrition. So I've signed up to do the Masters certification with them. And I've finished the baby aspect. And now I'm doing the pregnancy and postpartum on the side, as well.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

That's so cool.

Jess Anderson

Yeah, yeah, it is. And eventually, yeah, I'm going to be interested to see sort of where those other two topics take me. But for now, I'm really immersed in the baby nutrition. And, yes, and then yeah, Nourish and Bloom was born. So that's sort of that's awesome.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Wow, what a journey.

Jess Anderson

Yeah, it is a bit of a journey. And I really wanted to combine, you know, I was so passionate about teaching when I was teaching, it was, yeah, like, it really lit me up. And I knew that I still wanted to bring all of that knowledge with me, but into a different role. I just didn't want to do the traditional teaching role. And so now I can integrate it into my consults with parents and sort of give them insights into their child's development that they might not necessarily think about. And yeah, it's a really unique approach. I don't know anyone else in New Zealand, who is offering that sort of dual lens when it comes to their families, nutrition and meal times as well.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

That's awesome. So what would you say, are some of the most common problems that you see parents experiencing with mealtimes?

Jess Anderson

Oh, this is a good question. Ah there's, there's a lot. So I'll cover sort of the three probably most common ones that I see. I think when mealtimes aren't going to plan, or a parent knows that they could be going better. The first thing that's often recommended to a parent is to try and change the child. And so what I mean by this is that we're trying to change them by using sort of different a range of different tools in our toolkit. So we might bribe them. So that would look like you know, take a bite. And then you can have a fluffy or we threaten them. So that would look like if you don't eat this, there's nothing else and you're off to bed or we use star charts. So well done for eating. Here is your sticker or, you know, like here's your digger sticker to go and put on your chart or we put them in timeout. You know, like, if you don't eat your dinner, you need to go and sit on this chair or go to your room. Or we give them praise so well done for taking a bite of your dinner or well done for finishing your whole dinner. You're such a good eater, well done. And so you can see in those conversations and in those statements, all we're trying to do there is actually change the child and while things strategies and tools, like bribes and threats, they're often really effective in the beginning. And typically, it's pretty short lived. So I've spoken with a lot of parents who are relying on these, and they're like, all of a sudden, you know, the fluffy wasn't enough, we had to like up the game and use something more that was more enticing for them.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Start bringing out the chocolate.

Jess Anderson

Yes, yes, exactly. And so, you know, bringing out something else, it's then placing that emotional reward with the food. So it's putting chocolate or the fluffy in a higher level, than whatever's on the plate at the moment.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

I was thinking about that the other day, actually, now, you mentioned the emotional reward link to food. And I was thinking, Oh, we were leaving swimming. And one of the little habits we've sort of come into is that I always get Isla, a wee blackcurrant and this is like the juice that's blackcurrant and then with water in it. And I was like, ah, is this a good precedent to be sitting to be using food as a form of reward because, like, for myself, I've struggled with all sorts of disordered eating. And that kind of attitude that food is, you know, happiness, or I eat if I'm sad, or whatever, I thought that probably is something that starts at this really young age where if you're using things like bribery, or you know, you're just getting something because "Oh, she did really well at swimming today so she gets a juice", it's kind of like is that a good thing or a good precedent to be setting for them at that age?

Jess Anderson

Yes. Oh, my gosh, yes, this is such a great conversation. So it's very common, as well. And what we are sweeing now is a generation of like, women our age, you know, and we have grown up with that. And that's what we have integrated. And now it's what we, you know, we can do with our own children, because that's what we learned, you know, you went to a game of touch or something. I remember doing that as a child. And then on the way home, we would always stop at the local diner and get hot chips. It was like the treat afterwards, but it has that emotional like well done for doing a good game here. You can go and get your chips, and it has that emotional connection. So I'm not, definitely, I'm a realistic Mom, I'm not here to say don't give the juice, but what we can do is change our narrative around it. So it's not a here's the juice, because you've done really well at swimming. It's are you thirsty? Would you like a juice? And so it's sort of removing any praise to it and removing that emotional connection to it because, yeah, it's very common. And I have a practitioner that I talk with regularly, and she is working specifically, with mums who have that disordered eating going on. And then I'm at the other end of the spectrum, I'm trying to work with the mums to work with the children to stop it from even developing, you know, past toddlerhood or past when they're a baby. But it does, it's like anything, it's like any behaviour management strategies as well. You have to consciously make that change, you've got to break the cycle that has come through from your own childhood.

Jess Anderson

And an exercise I get parents to do all the time is really looking back at their childhood looking back at the relationship they have with food, and what pressure and expectations were put on them as well to eat meals. And yeah, what it looked like and but most importantly, how it makes them feel when they look back. Like do they get a feeling of safety from the food, you know what's coming up for them? Because it's just it's very interesting to take a deep dive and I don't think, yeah, I don't think we do that. enough. I don't think we sort of acknowledge where we've come from is influencing where we are so much, if that makes sense.

Jess Anderson

Yes, so if we talk about the bribes and threats as well, it really turns mealtimes from something that a child enjoys. So, you know, they can enjoy mealtimes because it's you know, they're filling their tummies with this yummy food, and it turns it into something that feels like work. So you do x and then you'll get y and then it makes them enjoy it less and instead of treating mealtimes as a time to you know, fill their tummies and satisfy that hunger. You know, it feels like work for them and they start to resist it.

Jess Anderson

So Janet Lansbury actually has a really fantastic article all about bribes and threats so I'm more than happy to send it through for your listeners and you can put it in the show notes because it is worth a read and I love the perspective that she shares on that as well. But also, you know if we really break down praising and using star charts and the bribing as well. You know, we're essentially overriding that innate wisdom that children have about how to nourish themselves. So, for example, if you're eating a meal with your child, and they say "finished", so they might use baby sign language, if they're not, you know, communicating with words yet, they might say "finished", or they might just shut their mouth and turn their head away if they're a little baby. And then we, instead of listening to that, we say things like, "just one more mouthful, come on Johnny, just one more", or how about "here comes the aeroplane, let's just do three more". And so I totally understand why we do that. Because I think as parents, we get so caught up that, if they don't have a good dinner, they won't sleep at night. And that sort of is always in the back of our minds. And I totally appreciate that.

Jess Anderson

But essentially, what we're telling them is that we don't value what you're telling us, and we know better. And so children are born with their innate knowledge of their hunger signals and their fullness cues. So it's really important for us to actually listen to that, and respect that when we can. So yeah, in my work, instead of focusing on changing the child, I focus on pretty much everything else. So I support parents to review the physical eating environment, their parents attitudes, and the strategies that they're using at meal times. And also we look at the food that they are offering and making sure that it's conducive to a successful meal time, as well.

Jess Anderson

So that's point number one, which turned into quite the spiel. Yeah, I'll share number two with you this sort of second most common thing I see with parents in that I work with parents on is that fear of choking that a lot of parents have, and what I find is that a parent will message me, you know, between sort of 10 months and a year when their baby's 10 months and a year, and they'll say that they haven't tried finger foods yet, because they're just so worried about the choking. And typically, what I see is it's parents who live further away from a hospital or a doctor, you know, further away from help so that they don't feel like they can get somewhere quickly to get that support. And I totally, you know, I totally, totally understand it. I do believe that if parents have the appropriate support in this area, then we wouldn't have so many concerned parents as well. Choking is actually the number one reason why parents don't give baby led weaning a chance. And they do, and they decide not to do finger foods right from the start. But actually, research shows that there's no difference in choking incidences between doing finger foods or doing spoon feeding. Plus, it is really unlikely for a baby to choke if they are given foods, finger foods that are the proper size, shape, and texture. So that's really a big part of how I support parents is showing them exactly sort of how to prepare and offer foods. And so they feel really confident moving forward with that. The other thing that parents can do, of course, is taking part in a CPR course or a baby infant, yeah, first aid course so that they feel really confident should a choking event happen. Yeah, they feel really confident navigating that as well.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

We had that happen. Unfortunately, the first time Isla ever tried pancakes.

Jess Anderson

Oh gosh.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah, I cut them into like good sized strips. And but the problem was that she stuffed lots in her mouth.

Jess Anderson

Yeah.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

And I don't know. I don't know why I didn't. I mean, in that moment, you just you don't know why you didn't think of it but yeah, she had sort of put a lot on her mouth and then obviously pancakes get quite claggy when they're in your mouth. And yeah, she swallowed the whole, tried to swallow the whole lot. And yeah, it was it was good because I had done first aid you know, a first aid course before so it just took over and I just flipped her over and banged her on the back and a bit of pancake fell out and the carpet, the dog came running over.

Jess Anderson

And you're like trembling. I can imagine.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

I was terrified. Like, "oh my god", and she was obviously upset because she had been unceremoniously put upside down and banged on the back but yeah, like it is. It is definitely a fear. I think for me with solids that was one of my bigger fears was that I'm giving her you know, like obviously those sort of starchy things because of the way they go in your mouth. But we did have a lot of success with you know, bits of like soft pear that we've cooked and like kumara and things like that that was cut into sticks and then cooked, that was really good. And broccoli, because broccoli I always feel looks scary, but it's, you know, it's not really because it's lots of little I don't even know what they, like the floret it is like made up. I don't know what the floret's made up of, the word. But, you know, like, it's, it's actually quite easy to eat. If you don'tgive them the stalk, obviously. Yeah, yeah, that worked worked quite well. But I can definitely see why lots of people would be afraid of the choking, because it was definitely a thing for me.

Jess Anderson

Yeah, absolutely. Like even myself, I was a bit like, Oh, yes. Okay, I can see how parents are worrying about this. And it is, it's scary. And that's amazing for you to know that your first aid training just kicked in, and took over in that moment, because that's why we do it. So for your listeners, there is an online version you can do through Tiny Hearts Education, they have a really great course that you can do. So you can do it online, you don't have to worry about trying to go in person if there isn't one around you. But really the key distinction there is that choking is totally silent. And so it happens when something completely blocks the airway and to make intervention is required. Whereas gagging is part of their like, it's actually a safety mechanism for them. So it's designed so when they're younger, and starting solids is actually further forward in their mouth. And then over the course of sort of six months until they get to a year it moves back closer to where an adult's one is. But that's why it gets triggered so easily. But it's also designed so that if they pick something up off the floor, it brings it out and pushes it out of the mouth. And gagging and coughing, it's really noisy and dramatic. And it sounds terrifying. Because we're like, oh my goodness, they're about to choke. But actually, it's really common. And it helps them to sort of learn how to regulate the food in their mouth as well. But the one thing is just not to put your finger in there and try and pull it out because it can actually push the food back down further. Yes.

Jess Anderson

And then, number the third? Yeah, the third common thing I see happening with me all times would be this one's probably going to ruffle a few feathers. But it would be it would be parents getting caught in that trap of kids food. So I talk about this often on my social media as well that in webinars to that. It's just a marketing scam, you know, it's really unnecessary, in my opinion, I really work closely with the parents I'm working with to open their eyes to seeing how foods can be prepared for all members of the family in different ways. But essentially the same foods, but just offered in different ways safely. And you know, babies can it once they've been introduced to those top allergens and all those different foods, they can really just become part of the family mealtime. So a big part of my support is providing those recipes and providing the meal ideas and the kitchen hacks and the like cooking techniques that I think we've all lost a lot of connection with.

Jess Anderson

Because once again, I'm a realist as a mum, like I know that packaged food has its place. But it's very, very difficult as a parent to you know, you're going to the supermarket or you're doing it online, you've got limited time you want to get in and get it out, get out and get it done. And you don't want to be sitting there trying to think okay, so is this one better than this one, this one's got that in it. This one's got that in it. You know, unfortunately, kids foods can really be some of the most additive rich foods that we find in the supermarket and it really like just breaks my heart really it shouldn't be that way. These are the youngest people in our society, we should be you know, putting foods on the shelves that are filled with nourishing foods for them but, like if we take colours for example. You know, research shows that they can cause asthma, behavioural problems, irritability, gastrointestinal problems, learning and concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, skin rashes, like the list just goes on. So yeah, it's a big part of what my approach includes is really supporting parents to take a different look at what their kids food can be.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

That's awesome. I think one of the things, we sort of started off with a lot of sort of baby foods, I guess, because I was really worried about the salt content in a lot of things.

Jess Anderson

Yeah.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

And so yeah, we'd have like, you know, the Watties kids spaghetti, for example. And then one day I tried it, and I was like, it's no wonder you don't eat this. It's disgusting. Like, spaghetti and you know, tomato sauce without any form of salt whatsoever is not a good time. So yeah, looking at it, I was kind of like, well, what's really in here that she's actually getting anything from? So we kind of did that similar approach where we've been doing the HelloFresh boxes, because it makes it easier for me with cooking dinner, but we just the reason I got those was because it was easy to get family friendly meals that we knew that she would eat. So you know, like, yes, she's a really big fan of pasta. But I'm kind of okay with that. Because in the pasta, I can sneak in, The HelloFresh boxes are really good at sneaking in a lot of vegetables in there. Which is really good. So yeah, I must say, I totally agree, seeing that. That changed for us from going from baby foods to her sort of eating pretty much what we're eating was really good. And it definitely made her eat a lot more at dinnertime than she used to.

Jess Anderson

Yeah, for sure. And I think, you know, when I was talking before about the three areas that I review with parents, and one of them is the food we offer. And that's really wise, because so often parents like, "Oh, my baby's not eating, or my toddlers refusing the meal". And then they taste it. And they're like, it's actually really gross and disgusting. Yeah. Supporting parents to make meals that are not only like nutritious and healthy, but they also taste really good. That's the key, like, we've got to make these foods that we're offering sing and just like be irresistible to children. If we're offering them to be bland, then yeah, it's no wonder that they're sort of turning their nose up at them. But it is really interesting as well on this sort of salt topic is that it's really commonly believed that we shouldn't be having any at all. And there's an author who specialises in pregnancy nutrition, and her name is Lily Nichols, she's got a fantastic book called Real Food for Pregnancy. And she's also got a very, very interesting article about salt in baby food.

Jess Anderson

And one of the most interesting things that I've taken away is that the salt that's added to family meals actually only accounts for like 5% of the total sodium intake. And so the rest is coming from those processed foods. So that's where if parents are asking me or what about salt, I say limit it. Generally, as the baby gets older and closer to a year, if they're not having a whole lot of processed foods, then they can have salt as a seasoning in their foods because it does actually have trace elements and minerals in there. And breast milk contains sodium. So we do know that sodium is actually really important for their electrolyte composition as well. But we don't obviously, we don't want to be overdoing it. So it's finding that balance, and some parents just prefer not to put any, in their food at all, knowing that they will have some processed food. So it's sort of up to the parent to make that judgement call. But the quality of the salt matters as well. So salt should actually be slightly damp. And it should be like pink, grey, or beige in colour. So when we're using salt, it really does matter about which salt we're using too. But I can send the article so so that you can link that for future reading to

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah, that'd be great. Thank you.

Jess Anderson

No worries.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Cool. So you've kind of peppered in a few tips in there. But what are some sort of main tips that you could share with parents that are having trouble at meal times with their baby or toddler?

Jess Anderson

Yes, yes. My biggest tip would probably be to include them in meal times more. And I think it's really commonly believed that it's easier and quicker to do it without them. But what we're doing by including them is giving them some ownership over the meal and especially for toddlers who are at their very independent stage, you know, when they're saying "I do myself" and "all by myself, Mama", you know, we really want to give them opportunities to exercise that because if we continue to resist it, it continues to persist. So what you resist persists. And so by allowing them and encouraging them to be involved, it actually can give them a sense of ownership over the mealtime so that they're more likely to participate in it as well.

Jess Anderson

So there's a concept called anticipate to participate. And so this is from Penny Brownlee, I love Penny Brownlee and Emmy Pikler, and Magda Gerber I love their work. And they talk about this concept where if a child can anticipate what's coming, they're more likely to participate. And I talk with parents about this a lot. But if they are being involved in the mealtime preparation, you know, and this might look like helping to grow the veggies in the veggie garden, it might look like helping to write the shopping list and go to the supermarket. It might look like picking the veggies and washing them, you know, there's a really great child friendly knife that children can use as they get older. It's called a kiddie cutter, I think. And it's got, you know, softer blades. So it still works and cuts the food, but it's unlikely to cut their fingers. And, yeah, so there's so many things you can do to get them involved in the mealtime. And by having them chop up some carrots, when they those carrots arrived on the table, you know, the toddlers sitting there thinking, hey, I actually picked those and they're probably more likely to then put them on their plate rather than, you know, mom, or dad or whoever putting down the food and saying, "Here's your dinner", you know, it's got no context, it's not meaningful for them. You know, it's just been sort of a surprise to them. And then they're like, "No, I don't want that". Because, you know, "I do it myself". And so if we can give them the chance to really have a role and show them that they're valued, and that not only are we teaching them, that skill of cooking and food preparation, but we're also showing them that we really value them in meal times as well. And it can go a long way.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah, that sounds like a lot of fun as well, just letting your kids be involved in cooking. I mean, sounds like fun, but also chaos. But yes.

Jess Anderson

Yes, I was just going to say that it's not sort of IF a mess happens, it's when the mess happens. So you have to take a deep breath. And just keep repeating to yourself that, you know, this is all part of the learning. And actually, I sort of I talk with parents a lot about forming that connection with their children before meal times as well. And it can just mean that they're going into the meal times with a really full emotional cup, and they won't be looking for that connection. And so by involving them in the preparation, you're sort of killing two birds with one stone because you're giving them the connection and helping them get involved in the preparation process. They've got ownership. They're feeling good, because they've had some time with you. So it's a really like it is a win win. Apart from the mess, which I know a lot of people people, yeah, don't really like. Yeah, so that would probably be my biggest tip. And then also just trusting their intuition would be the other thing that I really support parents, trusting what they're communicating with us trusting that they know best, they know their bodies best, and not trying to force our beliefs or our expectations onto them either.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Totally. So how can people get in touch with you if they would like to join one of your courses or if they need help?

Jess Anderson

Yeah, cool. So I have a group coaching programme called Nourished Child. And the next cohort of that begins in February next year. And so I created this programme because I found in my one to one consults, I was giving parents the 'what', you know, I was telling them what to do, but it's actually the 'how' and it's thst ongoing support. So knowing what to do when things happen, but also knowing how to offer meals, how to prepare them, and that next level of support was needed. So I created this programme, to provide that and it really is essentially teaching parents how to create calm, really nutritious and organised meal times for their family so they can transform their family's health for life. Like it's not something that you do and then your life continues as it was. It's yeah, it's a game changer and a big part of it as well is focusing on the health of the mum as well because it's typically the mum that I work with, and I know that if the mum isn't looking after themselves, then they're not in a position to do the best that they want to do in that area, because they just literally don't have the energy for it. So that's a really big part of what I support parents was, in fact, in the first week, we set a self care goal for us as the mums for the eight weeks together. And yeah, every week it came with them and see how they're going. And it might be something like going for a solo walk or having a bath or getting into bed earlier so they can get up earlier in the morning and do some stretching and journaling, whatever it is, it's just making it a priority, because so often, we don't, and it's so easy to put our loved ones ahead of us. So yeah, that's the group coaching. And then I do also work one on one with parents who are navigating fussy eating, if they're experiencing eczema with their child or constipation, or food sensitivities as well. So that's a, I do a two week package. So it's sort of either two weeks or eight weeks together.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

It's awesome. It's cool to hear that you focus on the food sensitivities as well, because that was something I was thinking about while you were talking. And so for myself, I've got an autoimmune. So it's always like, you know, trying to think about the things that I have to exclude, you know, maybe I don't have to exclude for Isla. So how do I sort of make sure that she's getting things that I can't eat and that sort of thing in her diet? So, yeah, that's really awesome.

Jess Anderson

Yes. And that's really common. And the other thing that's really common is that someone will be given advice, to "Oh just try going dairy free for a while", and then they don't actually realise when they're going dairy free, that there are key nutrients, they need to be making sure they're so getting in other foods. And so that's a really big part of my support is making sure that the nutritional needs of the child are being met, while they're doing the elimination diet to find out what was triggering them. Yeah, it's a bit of a minefield, though. So yeah, I can Yeah, I can totally understand why parents feel really overwhelmed by the thought of that, because it's not easy. And then all of a sudden, they're trying to find dairy free, gluten free, egg free, soy free recipes, and it's just like, whoo, yeah, it can feel too much.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah, there's so much stuff online that you can find. And then you're sort of like sitting there if you feel almost like paralysed by how much information you've got, you sort of think, Oh, where do I start? Or how do I start in overhauling my, my pantry and all that sort of stuff.

Jess Anderson

Yeah, totally. So that yeah, that really is where I support parents with it, like breaking it down into achievable steps for them. So it's not so overwhelming.

Jess Raubenheimer-Free

Yeah, sounds really awesome. So yeah, I think that's probably about it for today. But thank you so much for coming along. Really, really appreciate you coming and sharing your wisdom with us.

Jess Anderson

No problem at all. Thank you so much for having me.

Jess

I hope you all enjoyed this week's podcast. I know I've learned so much from Jess already. And I've got a lot of things that are going to implement at mealtimes at home. We could talk for days, so we'll definitely be having Jess back on a future episode. Next week, I'm going to be going a bit deep chatting about being the default parent and my experience with that, along with some tips for managing your sanity if you are also the default parent. Please don't forget to subscribe to The Mum Tribe podcast so you never miss an episode and we'll see you next week.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai